Workplace Groups: How do I make my Christian Workplace Group Relevant? 

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We all want to be considered as having 'worth' and to live a life that makes a real difference to others. It's something that we aspire to at work.To do this means being 'relevant' in what we do and to those with whom we interact. 
 
The same applies to our faith in God. As Christians we want people to recognise the value of what we believe, which for those at work, means living a Christian life in the workplace that is relevant to the organisation.
 
In thinking about this, how many people would notice Jesus if He turned up for work in your workplace? What kind of employee would He be? What sort of manager would He make? It's worth noting that Jesus was never antagonistic to the workplace and its employers. In fact the Bible encourages us to work in the same way as if we were working for Him (Colossians 3:23). This means that workplace Christians should be among the best employees any organisation could wish to have. They should be hard working, conscientious, trustworthy and totally reliable.
 
Christians often feel they are in the minority at work and rather than be noticed for their faith, would rather go ‘underground’ and keep quiet. But this isn't what God called us for. Instead He commanded us to go into the world and make all people His disciples, and that includes our place of employment and you can't do that by being quiet. So the issue is more about how we live out our faith in the workplace, in a way that fully reflects our Christian principles.
 
At Transform Work UK, we believe that one of the best ways to be an effective Christian witness is through relevant Christian Workplace Groups that benefit the organisation where they are based.  Groups that have formal organisational recognition can be a real positive influence within organisations and reflect the benefits of Christian values in the workplace.  Our latest booklet 'Starting a Christian Workplace Group' highlights a number of groups within the UK and the impact they are having in the workplace.
 
If there isn't a Christian group where you work, then connect up with other Christian colleagues to discuss forming one - our May newsletter article has suggestions on how you can identify them. 
 
Once you have established a group, the next step is to plan how you can benefit the organisation, which could include:

  • Meeting together regularly to pray for work colleagues, managers and the organisation as a whole. Never underestimate the power of prayer to change situations.
  • Celebrating major Christian festivals such as Easter by serving hot cross buns and giving out Easter eggs; or organising a Christmas Carol Service.
  • Arrange, in conjunction with your HR department, a 'Dealing with Workplace Stress' event. We have booklets and speakers that can help you with this.
  • If you have the space (or on a notice board) promote a 'Christianity Awareness week', which recounts the basis of our faith and the impact it has had on society over the years.
  • Supporting a local charity (or the organisation's own adopted charity). 


Effective and relevant Christian Workplace Groups can be seen as bringing benefits not only to Christians, but to all employees and the organisation as a whole. Our experience suggests that this can often attract the interest of people and prompt them to find out more about the group, their values and beliefs.
 
In our next article, we will look at how to get a Christian Workplace Group formally recognised by management.  If you can't wait or would like to know more about CWGs, get the booklet mentioned above using the following link www.transformworkuk.org/CWGBooklet.   From here you can either download a free electronic copy or order a paper copy.